From NCAA Tournament to CSU Rams, Ali Farokhmanesh proves not all heroes wear capes

Like a lot of sequels, this one didn’t hold a candle to the original, but it was cuter. It also did a triple salchow from script to screen. “I was not told,” Mallory Farokhmanesh said firmly, “that I was going to have a speaking line.” She has four, and they’re adorable. Almost as adorable as Mallory and Ali Farokhmanesh attempting to re-create one of the most bonkers moments in NCAA Tournament history with their three young children — Tai, 5; Mila, 2; and Liam, 1 — inside an empty Moby Arena. The Dagger turned 10 on Friday. To commemorate the trey Ali Farokhmanesh drilled for Northern Iowa against Kansas, the No. 1 overall seed in the 2010 tourney, the CSU athletic department dropped a short video in which Ali, now 31 and a Rams assistant men’s hoops coach, tries to “help” his family replicate the defining shot of his basketball life. As of early Saturday morning, the video had garnered almost 416,000 views on Twitter and more than 51,000 on Facebook. Shot last Thursday, it’s 75 seconds of pure gold, the perfect counterpoint to the mood of the moment, a little light at the end of a dark week. Even the trolling punch line of the piece — stick around for Liam’s show-stealing mome...

Sometimes, it’s the basics that make the biggest impression. No matter how considered or current a

Sometimes, it’s the basics that make the biggest impression. No matter how considered or current a particular outfit is, the simplest things done right are often the most effective. Take the white T-shirt, for example, which did more for James Dean, Marlon Brando and John Travolta (as Grease’s Danny Zuko) than any sequinned bomber jacket ever could. “It’s the one item that you can always count on,” says Damien Paul, head of menswear at Matches Fashion. “It’s rare to find a wardrobe conundrum that they can’t solve, and even in their ubiquity, they still retain an aura of cool.” But basic doesn’t mean skimping on detail, or quality – a £10 T-shirt won’t make the cut (or survive the washing machine). Here’s how to find the one that you want. First, a history lesson. In 1904 the Cooper Underwear Company ran an advert for its new bachelor undershirt, modelled by a mustachioed man who – were he not more than a century old – isn’t so far from the barista who brewed your artisanal single-origin coffee this morning. “Made with a neckband that stretches, it is easy to put on and take off,” read the original marketing spiel, further promising that “no buttons to come off ...